Proximity Blog

3 Digital & Marketing Candidates you DON’T want to be…

Candidate 1…. ‘Job for Lifer’

Usually makes a good start to their career; learns quickly, and progresses nicely. Then, progression slows but loyalty remains. They will know their time is up with their business but they are not prepared to make the decision to change or leave.

‘I’ve got it too good, it’s just too risky to move.’

They’ll probably have been looked after, on a decent package and comfortable, but not challenged (in a fast moving digital & marketing world!) and growing steadily unhappier day by day.

Danger with this state of mind? Once their frustration gets to the point where they decide they ‘must’ leave, they move quickly and potentially make a bad career choice. Keener to run away from the situation rather than towards a new challenge.

Right thing to do? Move on perhaps but don’t rush it.

Candidate 2…. ‘Ye of Little Resilience’

First sign of change, jump ship! Again, and again, and again! Everyone knows you shouldn’t have new permanent jobs every 4 months, it looks dodgy! It’s even dodgier when you can’t explain it or describe it as a ‘bad feeling’ you had about your boss or the business. Being subjective makes it difficult for people to emphasize with you.

Change can be good remember! ‘A smooth sea never made a talented sailor.’

Truth is most people make a mistake with their career; maybe moved to the wrong place, or even the right place but at the wrong time. Just try not to move too easily, especially with recruiters approaching you every 6 minutes, with positions paying £1.76 more a month and 33 seconds closer to home.

Danger with moving on again, and again? Eventually companies will start to think it’s you that’s the problem and not your old boss or business.

Right thing to do? If you can, stick it out – you never know you might learn something!

Candidate 3…. ‘Passionate in the Wrong Places’

Whilst in interview they will say ‘Well I kind of want your job, but first let me tell you about all the things I prefer to write/blog/photograph/design/digitize and all my other passions which I’ll probably leave early from work to get stuck in to every day whilst I’m employed with your business because that’s who I really am.’

Tone it down. This stuff is important, of course it is and usually interesting, but mainly to you. The great thing about the market we share is just that; we can translate our passions into material for the world to see, watch & read.

Danger with this mindset? You don’t talk about what you’re paid for in interview. Rightly or wrongly clients usually view unpaid work and paid work differently, be wise to it and prioritise the right stuff.

Right thing to do? Wind it in, whilst at interview stage. Let it run free once you’ve secured the job!